banner

Video raises ‘more questions than answers’

The family of Keith Lamont Scott says the footagle leaves ‘more questions than answers’ in the Charlotte police shooting. Picture: AP.

THE family of Keith Lamont Scott was shown video on Thursday of the moment he was fatally shot by police in Charlotte, North Carolina, and called for the footage to be released publicly, as protests continued in the city for a third night.

A lawyer for the family said footage of the 43-year-old father of seven being shot by police left them with “more questions than answers.”

Attorney Justin Bamberg told the Charlotte Observer that it was difficult to see whether Scott was holding anything, but noted that his hands were by his side and “he was slowly walking backwards” when shot on Tuesday.

Charlotte’s mayor said she does believe the video should be released publicly, but she says it’s a matter of when.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts said during a news conference on Friday that “I do believe the video should be released. The question is on the timing.” Police Chief Kerr Putney echoed her remarks, saying the video’s release is “a matter of when, it’s a matter of sequence.”

Members of the National Guard watch as demonstrators march in the rain on September 22, 2016 in Charlotte, NC. Picture: AFP.

Members of the National Guard watch as demonstrators march in the rain on September 22, 2016 in Charlotte, NC. Picture: AFP.Source:AFP

The video, captured by police body and dashboard cameras, could be vital to resolving the dispute between cops, who say Scott refused commands to drop a handgun, and residents, who maintain he was unarmed.

US President Barack Obama says recent reports of unarmed African Americans being shot by police “should be a source of concern for all Americans.”

Demonstrators stand on the street in downtown protesting Tuesday's fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C. Picture: AFP.

Demonstrators stand on the street in downtown protesting Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C. Picture: AFP.Source:AP

In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Obama declined to address specific cases, although he noted that the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, had invited the Justice Department to investigate the shooting there.

Obama said protesters expressing their frustrations by looting or breaking glass aren’t going to “advance the cause” of racial justice. He added, “my hope is that in days to come, people in the community pull together and say, ‘How do we do this the right way?”’ He said “it’s important for all of us to say we want to get this right.”

This story first appeared in the New York Post.